About the Hudson Valley

View of the Catskills beyond the Hudson RiverThe Hudson Valley refers to the valley of the Hudson River and its adjacent communities in New York State, generally from northern Westchester County northward to the cities of Albany and Troy.

At the time of the arrival of the first Europeans in the 17th century, the area of Hudson Valley was inhabited primarily by the Algonquian-speaking Mahican and Munsee Native American people, known collectively as River Indians.

In the early 1800s, popularized by the stories of Washington Irving, the Hudson Valley gained a reputation as a somewhat gothic region inhabited by the remnants of the early days of the Dutch colonization of New York (see, e.g., The Legend of Sleepy Hollow).

Upstate New York, to many people's amazement, is filled with fascinating sites of deep spiritual and esoteric significance. The ancient land of the Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy, its reputation in the 19th century as the Burned Over District derived from the waves of evangelical fervor that swept across the state. It was also the birthplace of American Feminism, Spiritualism, and the utopian Oneida Community. The area is associated with the Hudson River School, a group of American Romantic painters who worked from about 1830 to 1870. During our post-conference journey, we will explore many of these themes and sights.

The natural beauty of the Hudson Valley has earned the Hudson River the nickname “America's Rhine,” a comparison to the famous 40 mile (65 km) stretch of Germany's Rhine River valley between the cities of Bingen and Koblenz. A similar 30-mile (48 km) stretch of the east bank in Dutchess and Columbia counties has been designated a National Historic Landmark.

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Esoteric Upstate New York:
Iroquois Nations, Feminists, Utopians and 21st Century Esotericists
 
 
 
Greece 2008
Spain 2007
Czech Republic/Germany 2006
Italy 2000
Wales 1998
Prague 1997
Bohemia1995